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Five Best Blogs & Tweets: Departing House Leader Rails Against Neighborhood-Based School Assignment

Cantor decries neighborhood/school quality linkage  ow.ly/zQlsp USA Today via @RedditEducation  

Fact-Checking UFT’s Attack on NOLA Schools | PE + COow.ly/zQlp0 @petercook

Snapshot of Teacher Union Spending on House, Senate Campaigns  @PoliticsK12  ow.ly/zQ8ez  @laurenonthehill

Vox points out big but little-known hole in union spending figures ow.ly/zR1Ob

2014's top lobbying spenders so far - Washington Postow.ly/zQmeg Labor unions/teachers *not* among them

Why poor kids fail to show up for college - and lie to college counselors about it - Jay Mathews ow.ly/zQmBG

Knowledge Isn’t Power - NYT ow.ly/zPUAI Krugman on politicians and the public ignoring expertise

Campaigns: Those Union Spending Numbers Are Only Half The Story

Quotes2Unions are important financial powerhouses in elections, but much of their spending is done in such a way that it doesn't show up on FEC reports — it involves getting out the vote or internal communication with their members rather than paid TV ads.  Vox

John Thompson: Jal Mehta's Ten Inconvenient Truths

MehtaJal Mehta, in the Education Week blog Learning Deeply, discusses five inconvenient truths held by both reformers and education traditionalists. I'm not sure why he only mentions five minor blind spots held by reformers.

Perhaps Mehta is being diplomatic or maybe his excellent Allure of Order did such a great job of chronicling the failures of accountability-driven reformers that he didn’t see the need to repeat its diagnoses of their shortcomings. 

Frankly, I think Mehta has chosen a rhetorical path halfway between reformers and their opponents, and he believes he can do the greatest good by sticking to it. Metha is not playing politics; but he seeks consensus. 

I respect that. 

My five inconvenient truths ignored by reformers would be, first, high stakes testing and, second, increased segregation are inherently destructive, so reformers need a very strong reason for imposing either.

Third, education is an act of love and trusting relationships are the key but, fourth, the reformers’ politics of destruction and the demonization of teachers and unions undermine those relationships.

Fifth, reformers should have accepted the burden of proving that their policies would do more good than harm. 

Mehta’s critique of traditionalists, however, is profound.   Hardly a day passes when I don’t wrestle with his “Inconvenient Truth 1: Longstanding institutions are not good at doing things other than what they were initially designed to do.” Mehta’s insight applies to all social institutions, not just education.

Continue reading "John Thompson: Jal Mehta's Ten Inconvenient Truths" »

Books: The Unexpected Alliance Of Civil Rights & Women's Rights Groups

The best education-related article in the New Yorker of the past few weeks might not be Rachel Aviv's piece about the "burn-it-down-to-save-it" actions taken by some Atlanta teachers pressured to produce better results but rather Louis Menand's story about how women's rights and civil rights advocates came together uneasily.

Called The Sex Amendment, Menand's piece uses a couple of new books to tracethe work of women's rights advocates -- in almost total opposition from the rest of the liberal establishment (including civil rights leaders). "The last thing any of these people wanted was a group with a different agenda crashing the party."
 
Key takeaways for education types include the strong differences within the civil rights movement and with the women's rights movement, and the unexpected turns of events that created new opportunities and turned enemies into reluctant allies.
 
No time to recap or make all the connections, but trust me it's a good read for anyone trying to figure out how things end up getting done even when groups generally aligned (say, Democrats, or education advocates) have ended up in staunch opposition on the particulars.  I have no idea how or when this kind of thing could happen in education, but have the sense that it will -- some surprising set of events and alliances not currently part of the stalemated war between reformers and their critics.
 

Morning Video: Colbert Interviews Campbell Brown Over Tenure Lawsuit

Here's the interview -- how'd she do? How'd Colbert do? 

AM News: Friday Roundup Lacks Any Clear Theme Or Headline

This Will Make Some Special Education Advocates Really Happy HuffP{ost: The Education Department said Thursday that New York, as well as Minnesota, South Carolina, Delaware and Georgia, could hold onto waivers from the No Child Left Behind Act for another year. 

Protesters slam teacher tenure foe Campbell Brown NY Daily News:  About 20 protesters gathered outside “The Colbert Report” studios in Hell's Kitchen Thursday shouting "there's nothing funny about Campbell..."

Retired Philadelphia Teachers Surrender Certifications in Cheating Scandal District Dossier: The educators agreed never to seek work at public, charter or cyber schools or with contracted education providers.

D.C. School Test Scores Inch Up, But No Repeat Of 'Historic' Jumps WAMU: D.C. officials announced today that math and reading proficiency rates were again up for the city's public and charter schools, though some of the gains were modest and others uneven.

North Carolina Budget May Raise Teacher Pay NYT: The North Carolina Senate moved toward sealing a long-sought budget accord on Thursday, voting in favor of a $21 billion plan that would raise the salaries of public schoolteachers but impose cuts elsewhere in state government.

School Shelters Offer Limited Safety, and Even Less Comfort NYT: Life for about 200,000 people packed into more than 80 schools serving as shelters in Gaza is full of deprivation and discomfort.

Emanuel's deputy education chief leaving post Tribune: Mayor Rahm Emanuel's point person on Chicago Public Schools is leaving City Hall today to join the Joyce Foundation, 

Five Best Blogs & Tweets: Generals Back Common Core [Is That A Good Thing?]

450 pro-Common Core Army generals say teacher preparedness tied to national security The Tennesean ow.ly/zNMZY #thankscommoncore?

WI High Court Upholds Law Curbing Collective-Bargaining Rights for Public Employees - WSJ @carolineporter ow.ly/zNOf2

The End of Paper-and-Pencil Exams? [Yes.] @TheAtlanticEDU @EWAEmily ow.ly/zOmVQ

Arnold Foundation helping CPI track funding in 6,300 state level races this year : CJR ow.ly/zNPvM

Things are better, and they're worse, says Fordham's Finn in a farewell message ow.ly/zOmlo No, you're not invited to the party.

Forget the surge of unaccompanied minors hitting some districts -- how about the big surge in suburban poverty? TIME ow.ly/zNOH3

Don’t Teach Math, Coach It - NYT oped by Jordan Ellenberg ow.ly/zOnjS

Choice: Chicago Teacher Rebuts Public Radio's "The Big Sort"

You may recall a big WBEZ Chicago Public Radio piece about student segregation at the high school level, which was passed around a lot last week. But not everybody thinks that students sorting themselves into different high schools is such a bad idea.  
 
Chicago teacher Ray Salazar outlined some concerns in a post titled School Choice Happens that noted the limits of neighborhood schools and the potential upsides of kids getting out of their home neighborhoods. Reporter Linda Lutton responded in comments, and the subject was further discussed on my Chicago site (Teacher Pushes Back On WBEZ “Sorting” Story).
 
Check it out -- what do you think?

Update: West Coast Reboot For DFER & Steve Barr

image from www.dfer.org

 

 

DFER California is re-launching operations for 2014 and beyond, kicked off with a few events and announcements (see press release below).  

As a big part of that effort, DFER has hired Steve Barr to be the state chapter head.  Former state legislator Gloria Romer was the previous head.  

Barr founded Green Dot Schools and more recently headed FIN Schools, which I'm told has been winding down its operations in recent months.

Previous posts:  Pro-Charter Dem PAC Expands To CA [2010]; Strange Times In California [2012]; Green Dot & Steve Barr Finalize Their "Divorce" [2011]; Barr Nonprofit Re-Focuses On Teacher Advocacy [2013]

Continue reading "Update: West Coast Reboot For DFER & Steve Barr " »

Quotes: The Coming Union Backlash Against Reform Democrats

Ultimately, the union backlash is likely to be channeled into the 2016 Democratic primary. Of the various sources of liberal dismay that may be brought to bear upon Hillary Clinton — Warren-esque concern with inequality, unease with the Clinton’s hawkish record — the most focused and organized may well be the cause of the unions.

-- Jonathan Chait NY Magazine (Teachers Unions Turn Against Democrats)

AM News: Common Core Movement Rolling On, Despite Setbacks

Common Core May Persist, Even in Opposition States EdWeek: So far there is little sign and not a great deal of precedent that the states backing away from the common core, or considering doing so, will ultimately produce anything that is truly different from those standards.

What Common Core Looks Like In A Second Grade Classroom NPR: The Common Core State Standards in reading and math have generated lots of attention and controversy, but what do they look and sound like in a classroom? Michigan Radio's Sarah Alvarez offers a peek at the standards at work in a second grade math class.

Huge confusion in Mississippi over Common Core Hechinger: Under the Common Core standards, students are learning more challenging content earlier. For example, Mississippi’s kindergarteners were expected to count to 20 under the old standards. Under Common Core, they must count to 100.

The biggest benefit of pre-K might not be education Vox: One of the most common arguments in favor of universal pre-K is the argument that it will actually save money: $7 for every $1 invested, according to President Obama's proposal for expanding pre-K access. Some studies have found an even higher return — as high as $16 to $1 — on investment from sending 4-year-olds to school.

A Shattered School in Gaza New Yorker: Tuesday night, thirty-three hundred people were crowded into the Jabaliya Primary School for Girls, in Gaza, when, according to the United Nations, the school was hit three times by explosions.

More news below (and throughought the day at @alexanderrusso).

Continue reading "AM News: Common Core Movement Rolling On, Despite Setbacks" »

Five Best Blogs & Tweets: Hoboken Laptop Experience Unusual / Misleading

Lots of districts avoid Hoboken's unusually disastrous 1:1 deployment  saga  ow.ly/zKKxD @hechingerreport @pwillens

Chart: Top Liberal Campaign Spenders 2012 - via Voxow.ly/zKHsh includes Bloomberg, Soros, Fred Eychaner, etc.

Readers respond angrily to "practice" school-shooting story ow.ly/zKFno via @romenesko

Race to the Top, Wasn't : Frederick M. Hess ow.ly/zKJcZ@rhess99 via @DianeRavitch

Remembering Gene Maeroff - Education Next : Education Next ow.ly/zL69g (features audio interview)

Some Wisconsin schools oppose Common Core repeal ow.ly/zKF4h AP via @RealClearEd

I'm really enjoying the anonymous fun of #thankscommoncore @thnkscommoncore -- but I also want to know who started it??

Quotes: Rhee Cites DC Precedent For Union-Approved Tenure/Seniority Changes

Ultimately [in DC], we signed a contract with the union that addressed a lot of these issues, and the American Federation of Teachers signed off on it. So we have a precedent to be able to do this. (In D.C.) we are now retaining the most highly effective teachers at much higher rates.

- Michelle Rhee in NPR (Teacher Tenure Challenges)

 

Morning Video: Can After-School/Extended Day Programs Make A Difference?

"At Middle School 223 in the Bronx, the fun starts at the end of the regular day. All sixth graders are offered extracurricular activities like African drumming, latin dance and chess, plus personalized help in reading and math." (Why longer school days can be more fun for students)

 

AM News: Union Defends Tenure/Seniority Rules Against Lawsuits

New York Educators Fight Back on Attacks to Tenure NYT: The United Federation of Teachers sent out a memo defending tenure laws after two parents groups in New York filed lawsuits to challenge it.

Union Claims Weak Teachers Are Shown the Door WNYC: With its cherished tenure system under scrutiny, the New York City teachers union claimed on Tuesday that hundreds of teachers leave the city schools every year for failing to meet professional standards or as a result of disciplinary actions, even though very few of them are actually fired.

Q&A: Michelle Rhee On Teacher Tenure Challenges NPR: Her group played a supporting role in both the California and New York challenges and is now considering action in several other states.

COMMON CORE

Bobby Jindal Is Being Sued By His Own School Board Over The Common Core HuffPost: On Tuesday, the Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) voted 6-4 to join the lawsuit against Jindal, known as Navis Hill, et al., v. Louisiana State. 

Can special education students keep up with the Common Core? The Hechinger Report: On a morning in late May, the pace was slow and deliberate as seven students formed a semicircle around their teacher to work on a lesson about finding the main idea in a story.

AFTER-SCHOOL

Can after-school programs help shrink the ‘opportunity gap’ for low-income students? PBS NewsHour: Middle School 223 in the Bronx, NY, is one of about 1,000 public schools in the U.S. offering low-income students a host of fun and educational classes after the final bell rings. But despite their best intentions, after-school programs may be overlooking the “elephant in the room”.

More news below (and throughout the day at @alexanderrusso).

Continue reading "AM News: Union Defends Tenure/Seniority Rules Against Lawsuits" »

Five Best Blogs & Tweets: #ThanksCommonCore

How textbooks describe war has changed dramatically says @PacificStand ow.ly/zIE5z @bechang8.

Are 1:1 computer deployments not all that helpful, as this @WNYC story suggests - or did Hoboken just do it wrong? ow.ly/zIn9R

Mead: 5 Totally Doable Things to Improve Head Start @saramead ow.ly/zIn2Y

Diane Ravitch has met with 46k more teachers than Arne Duncan in the past year, she says ow.ly/zIK7d

Aldeman chides (get it?) Green for ignoring improved math results in her NYT story ow.ly/zIoAI 

To Stop Cheating, Nuclear Officers Ditch The Grades : NPR ow.ly/zIrkY 

Cory Booker, Rand Paul, & Rachel Racusen (again) make The Hill's "50 Most Beautiful" list for 2014ow.ly/zIu2p Any other edtypes?

John Thompson: An American Who Stinks at Math Wowed by Elizabeth Green's Explanation

MathI was slow to follow the link to Why Do Americans Stink at Math?, in the New York Times Magazine, and I did not see it as a "must read" until I realized it was written by the Chalkbeat's Elizabeth Green.

I’m bad at math and I don’t see Americans’ problems with math as that big of a deal. I’m much more concerned with the challenge of improving reading comprehension in the 21st century.

As I understand it, math is a precise language, combined with logic. Few teachers are prepared to holistically teach this language or explain to students what the purpose and meaning of the subject is. Besides, contemporary American culture is not at its best in terms of valuing non-English languages, much less translating words and concepts into numbers and symbols.

Green grabbed me when citing John Allen Paulos’s diagnosis of innumeracy— “the mathematical equivalent of not being able to read.” She then reports that on the NAEP, “three-quarters of fourth graders could not translate a simple word problem about a girl who sold 15 cups of lemonade on Saturday and twice as many on Sunday into the expression ‘15 + (2×15).’”

Continue reading "John Thompson: An American Who Stinks at Math Wowed by Elizabeth Green's Explanation" »

Quotes: Teaching Isn't Rocket Science

Quotes2You don’t need to be a genius... You have to know how to manage a discussion. You have to know which problems are the ones most likely to get the lessons across. You have to understand how students make mistakes — how they think — so you can respond to that.

-- Author Elizabeth Green in Joe Nocera NYT column about improving teacher preparation

Morning Video: New Efforts To Engage Emotional Support For Common Core

 

Here's an example of how Common Core supporters are going to try and engage the public with outrage over the current inequalities and inadequacies of the education system  - and inspiration about what the new standards can do. From NCLR via Politico. #whimsical

AM News: NY Gets A Vergara Lawsuit (MN, CT, NJ & TN Could Be Next)

New York’s teacher tenure faces second challenge as Campbell Brown’s group files suit Chalkbeat:  In the past, Mayor Bill de Blasio has defended teacher tenure as a way to recruit and retain effective teachers. A spokesman from the state said they could not comment on pending litigation.

Second Vergara-Inspired Lawsuit Filed in New York Teacher Beat: "Campbell Brown may be tearing up, but her secret hedge-fund supporters will be crying all the way to the bank if she succeeds in her mission to undercut public education and privatize our schools," UFT President Michael Mulgrew said in a statement. "Parents know that attacking teachers is not the answer to the problems of New York's public schools.  We expect New York's courts to reject the fact-challenged and legally questionable assertions in this case."

Teacher Tenure Fight Comes to New York City NPR: Seven parents filed a lawsuit with New York State Supreme Court on Monday seeking to overturn teacher tenure laws that they said prevent their children from receiving a "sound basic education" that is guaranteed by New York State’s constitution.

Campbell Brown takes on teacher tenure in New York Washington Post: An advocacy group headed by former television journalist Campbell Brown filed a lawsuit in New York on Monday that seeks to overturn the state’s tenure laws and other job protections for teachers.

Teacher Tenure Lawsuits Spread NPR: Rhee's group is considering additional suits in Minnesota, Connecticut, New Jersey and Tennessee.

The Common Core PR war Politico:Supporters of the Common Core academic standards have spent big this past year to persuade wavering state legislators to stick with the new guidelines for math and language arts instruction. The millions have proved no match for the moms. 

What Happens When High School Administrators Get Caught Plagiarizing HuffPost: Although high school students are regularly warned to avoid plagiarism and are often punished when they slip, a steady stream of high school administrators have come under fire lately for engaging in that very practice. 

Boston Plan for Cameras and Microphones on School Buses Comes Under Fire District Dossier: An editorial in The Boston Globe Monday called the plan to install microphones on school buses "bad public policy and a bad lesson for students."

NYC Uses Food Trucks to Bring Summer Meals to Kids AP: NYC uses food trucks to bring free summer meals to kids; more mobility, less stigma.

More news and commentary throughout the day at @alexanderrusso.

Five Best Blogs & Tweets: You're Fired -- I Mean, Fined

NYC Teachers in Disciplinary Cases More Often Fined Than Fired - WSJ ow.ly/zEQ1a @lesliebrody

Salon: The plot to destroy education: Why techn could ruin US classrooms — by trying to fix them" ow.ly/zFflP

Not All Discipline Disparities May Be The Result Of Implicit Bias - @shankerblog ow.ly/zFVN1

Democrats are more liberal now than 20 years ago -- and most active Dems are liberal, too, says Politicoow.ly/zFfc3

Abq Journal: Panelists provide transparency in New York Education Department's setting of "cut scores"ow.ly/zFiVC via RCE

Don't like these? Lots more to pick from (esp. from over the weekend) at @alexanderrusso.

 

Quotes: "Don't Call [Common Core Opponents] 'Crazies'," Says Developer

I think then we make a great mistake by caricaturing the opponents of the standards as crazies or people who don't tell the truth... We will lose, and we'll lose things of great importance, if we dismiss this as an extremist position. - David Coleman in BloombergEDU interview via Politico

Morning Video: Head Start Helping Head Start Kids With Trauma

PBS: A program in Kansas City, Missouri is trying to stem [preschool expulsions] by "looking beyond the classroom to the issues these children face at home -- and helping them to feel safe." (Giving traumatized kids a head start in healing)

AM News: Lawsuits Filed In NY & CA Against Tenure Protections & Inadequate ELL Service

Campbell Brown’s group to file teacher tenure suit ChalkbeatNY: A group of seven families led by the news-anchor-turned-education-activist Campbell Brown will file a complaint in state court on Monday. The suit, to be filed in Albany by Brown’s group, is the second such case in New York and follows a California ruling in June that deemed teacher tenure laws in that state unconstitutional.

Feds back English learner lawsuit against state EdSource via Hechinger: The American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California has found an ally in the U.S. Department of Justice for its lawsuit charging that the state abdicated its obligation to ensure all students classified as English learners get extra instructional services to become fluent in English. The lawsuit, filed in April 2013, is set for a one-day trial next week in Los Angeles County Superior Court.

Washington state stands alone on US education law AP: When the past school year began, four states were in danger of losing their waivers from aspects of the law. But only one has actually lost the flexibility Duncan began promoting in 2011: Washington. The three others - Oregon, Kansas and Arizona - appear to be on the path to resolving their differences with the federal government.

Learning To Read May Take Longer Than We Thought NPR: A Dartmouth study suggests that fifth-graders are still "learning to read," not just "reading to learn."

Gene I. Maeroff, Education Reporter and Author, Dies at 75 NYT: A former education reporter for The Times, Mr. Maeroff found a second career working as an author, a researcher and an adviser on education issues.

More news below (and throughout the day at @alexanderusso).

Continue reading "AM News: Lawsuits Filed In NY & CA Against Tenure Protections & Inadequate ELL Service" »

Twitter Friday: News & Commentary Here, On Facebook, & Via Twitter

It's Friday and so I'll be updating the site -- lightly -- via Twitter (which also posts to Facebook and here). See it all below. Have a great weekend!

Five Best Blogs & Tweets: Clinton Launches #BabyTalking Campaign

Clinton Launches Baby-talking Campaign In Oakland ow.ly/zxPJy #babytalking 

Unions put teachers on streets — for votes - http://POLITICO.com  Print View http://ow.ly/zxq4G 

Self-proclaimed "naive" NYC Teaching Fellow Florina Rodov aims to open her own school next yearow.ly/zxDgA @TheAtlanticEDU

Do the CAP teacher salary report & coverage seem misleading to you like it does to me? ow.ly/zyp7n@MrPABruno @SchlFinance101

New think tank started by CAP economist will fund Berkely's Jesse Rothstein on ed ineq, reports @TheStoryline ow.ly/zycgT

Ed tech promoters need to understand how most of us learn | The Hechinger Report ow.ly/zxWbN

Washington Post's @TheStoryline is latest entry in wonky explainer sites like @vox. RSS ow.ly/zycMu You're welcome

 

Maps: Which States Are Changing Which Charter Laws To Do What?

Screen shot 2014-07-24 at 12.18.16 PMFrom ECS: "42 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico have charter school laws. Important, evolving elements of these state laws include: Statewide authorizing bodies (33 states); Standards for authorizers (quality school authorizing) (15 states and D.C.); Requirements that authorizing bodies report annually on their portfolios of schools (15 states and D.C.); Explicit performance thresholds below which charters must be revoked or non-renewed (11 states and D.C.); Explicit attention to one type of charter: the Internet, or cyber charter (24 states define or permit; 20 outline elements of oversight)."

 Charter Schools Database via EdWeek.

Image Flickr CC via

Thompson: Burris Documents Damage Done By Tracking & School Reform

BurrisWe know Carol Burris for her insightful critiques of the contemporary school reform movement, but at first glance her On the Same Track seems to be a history of the bad old days. She presents an authoritative account of the severe damage done by “tracking” students, or assigning them to classes based on their so-called abilities. 
But, isn’t the fight to “de-track” classes and to offer the same opportunity for challenging instruction a distant memory from an ugly era? 
Burris begins with a photo of three English students. The color of their ties denotes their place in the school hierarchy. The one with the purple tie is “gifted and talented.” But, it is not a picture of Victorian times. It was taken in 2012. 
The beauty of On the Same Track is two-fold. Her history of the perpetuation of segregation through tracking of students in the second half of the 20th century, and of promising efforts to fight it, presents an overwhelming case against grouping students according to their achievement levels. It includes the research that market-driven, test-driven reformers should have considered before imposing their theories of school improvement on 21st century schools. 
Even better, Burris lets the evidence lead the reader to a startling realization. Reformers, who sought to help poor children of color, have recreated segregation patterns that rival those that grew out of the overt racism of previous generations. We now avoid the word tracking, and we don’t like to think of America as returning to the class-bound structure of England, but much of that evil is being revived in the name of school improvement.

Continue reading "Thompson: Burris Documents Damage Done By Tracking & School Reform" »

Quotes: That Campaign Field Worker Might Well Be A Teacher

Quotes2If someone knocks on your door and says, ‘I’m Mark, I’m from the state Democratic Party,’ you take the literature and shut the door. “If you say, ‘Hi, I’m Karen, I’m a third-grade teacher at Hillsmere Elementary and I’m here to tell you what’s at stake for public education,’ that gets a very different reaction from the voter. - Karen White, political director for the National Education Association in today's Politico story (Unions put teachers on streets — for votes)

AM News: State Giving Early Peek At New Test Reesults

Districts get early look at test scores as SED responds to concerns ChalkbeatNY: State education officials said they’re releasing “instructional reports” to districts more than a month earlier than in previous years. It’s the first time it will come before the state’s release of statewide test results, which officials said won’t come for at least another two weeks.

A Bird's-Eye View On Common Core Across The Country NPR: With conservative commentator Glenn Beck renewing his fight against the Common Core State Standards, it's worth taking a bird's-eye view of the learning benchmarks. Where are they now being implemented, what challenges remain and what does the coming school year have in store?

Glenn Beck takes to the theaters to attack Common Core Washington Post: Conservative media commentator Glenn Beck led a national strategy session to kill the Common Core State Standards on Tuesday night, using a two-hour simulcast into movie theaters across the country as a way to embolden critics of the standards and recruit foot soldiers to the cause.

Glenn Beck Takes His Campaign Against Common Core To The Big Screen NPR: Conservative commentator Glenn Beck hosted a live, interactive "night of action" against the Common Core State Standards. He has long fought against the learning benchmarks in reading and math now being used in 43 states. Events such as these, and the Common Core itself, could continue to play a role in the 2014 midterm campaigns.

Why Do Americans Stink at Math? NYT Magazine: The Common Core should finally improve math education. The problem is that no one has taught the teachers how to teach it.

Charter School Cap and Closure Laws Among Growing Policy Trends EdWeek: The report says 15 states and the District of Columbia have established standards for authorizers, while 16 states and D.C. require authorizers to submit annual reports on their portfolios of schools. The brief also points to statewide authorizing bodies as another policy trend: Of the 42 states with charter laws, 33 have an authorizer that charters and oversees schools statewide. The remaining policy trends identified by the Denver-based ECS were not directly related to charter school authorizing, but still share oversight as a theme.

More news below (and throughout the day at @alexanderrusso).

Continue reading "AM News: State Giving Early Peek At New Test Reesults" »

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in This Week In Education are strictly those of the author and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Scholastic, Inc.